Category: Fabulous Plants

Salvias – Sage

These are very versatile plants. Members of the mint family, thus the interesting square stems. These have a long blooming time of May through October in shades of purple and pink. Salvia love sun and are fairly drought tolerant after about a year of establishment. The do like drained soils, so no wet sites. Mints tend to be deer resistant, for those who share their space with these guys. If cut back after flowering, a second flush of blooms will follow. Sweet!

salvia plant called sage

From Left to Right:

‘Marcus’ – short, compact plant with deep purple flowers ‘Sensation Rose’ – very short, dark rose florets with dark stems ‘Eveline’ – tall type with large, light pink florets, ‘Blue Hill’ – clear, lilac blue

salvia plant

From left to Right:

‘East Friesland’ – Stiff, upright wands of purple ‘May Night’ – Freer-form purple ‘Caradonna’ – Tall, stiff, darkest purple stems that stay showy even after blooming.

© The Naturarian

Grasses for Fall Color

ornamental grassesMany residents of the Midwestern (Zone 5) area want more than just summer blooms within their gardens, they also want autumn colors. Many folks think of trees and shrubs for fall color, but ornamental grasses also offer exceptional fall color.

Grasses offering RED fall colors:

  • Imperata ‘Red Baron’ – Japanese blood grass – under 2 feet – Foliage turns red in late summer – Plume-less
  • Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ – dwarf maiden grass – 3 feet high – Plumes emerge pink, then turns to white
  • Miscanthus ‘Grazella’ – maiden grass – 5-6 feet high – Foliage turns red in early fall – White plumes in August
  • Miscanthus ‘ Purpurascens’ – flame grass – 3-5 feet high – Foliage turns red in mid-summer, changing to deep burgundy in fall – Cottony plumes in August
  • Panicum ‘Ruby Ribbons’ – switch grass – 3-4 feet high – Foliage becomes red-wine colored by mid summer – Plumes appear in late summer
  • Panicum ‘Prairie Fire’ – switch grass hybrid – 4-5 feet high – Foliage turns deep red in early summer – Rosy panicles in late summer
  • Schizachyrium scoparium – little bluestem – 2-3 feet high – Foliage turns red-bronze in fall – Plumes are silvery-white in August

Grasses offering ORANGE fall colors:

  • Seslria autumnalis – moor grass – 12-18 inches high – Foliage turns warm rust in fall – Plumes appear summer into fall
  • Miscanthus ‘Nippon’ – maiden grass – 4 feet high – Foliage turns red-orange in fall – Reddish-bronze panicles develop in August
  • Sporobolus heterolepsis – prairie dropseed – 2-3 feet high – Foliage is fragrant and turns rust colored in fall

Grasses offering BURGUNDY fall colors:

  • Panicum ‘Rotstrahlbusch’ – red switch grass – 3-4 feet high – Foliage emerges green with red tips, depending on the weather, may develop burgundy hue – Scarlet-red panicles emerge in mid summer
  • Panicum ‘Shenandoah’ – red switch grass – 4 feet high – Foliage develops burgundy tips in early summer – Burgundy panicles appear in mid summer
  • Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’ – variegated maiden grass – Foliage remains variegated – Burgundy plumes fade to cream color
  • Miscanthus ‘Silver Feather’ or ‘Silberfeder’ – maiden grass – Foliage blends into burgundy, purple, and gold – Silver plumes in late summer

Grasses offering YELLOW fall color:

  • Molinia ‘Dauerstrahl’ or ‘Faithful Ray’ – purple moor grass – 2 feet high – Foliage turns yellow in early fall
  • Molinia caerulea ‘Strahlenquelle’ or ‘Source of Rays’ –  purple moor grass – 18-24 inches high – Foliage turns golden yellow in fall – Purplish plumes appear from July through October
  • Molinia ‘Skyracer’ – tall purple moor grass – 7-8 feet high – Foliage turns golden yellow in fall – Airy, copper-gold plumes appear in July and August
  •  Panicum ‘Heavy Metal’ – switch grass – 3-5 feet high – Foliage turns bright yellow in fall – Pink plumes develop into buff colored seed heads
  •  Panicum ‘Northwind’ – switch grass – 5-6 feet high – Foliage turns golden yellow in fall – Seed heads are small

© The Naturarian

Summer Annual Pots

shade annuals in pot
Summer Annual Container

If you’re looking for sensational summer color, look no further! Summer pots are the way to go. Not only are they full of pizzazz, the color is often right in your face, literally, especially if your favorite container is on a pedestal.

You don’t need to remember a bunch of annual names. The only thing you need remember for a well-presented display is: Thriller, Filler & Spiller! The Thriller is that one large plant that is generally in the center and taller than the rest. Filler are those mid-range sized plants, often of ‘fatter or fuller’ stature. Spiller is just that, plants that hang over the edge of the pot.

Here’s where your imagination needs to run free through the flowers. In many of the containers below, the photos are of the plants after there has been a bit of growth put on them. You can also get instant height from a trellised plant such as a mandevilla, jasmine or other vine.

Another tip ~ Flowering can be increased if the plants are kept on the drier side. This takes a bit of skill, as you don’t want them to dry-out, but keep them on the brink of drying. Why?!? Because. Think of it this way. If you’re kept all fat and happy without doing anything, why not just enjoy the hand-outs? (can you say ‘vegetative growth’? Haha!) Just like some of the folks living off us tax-payers, yet they have nicer stuff than me. =-( However, if you need to work for everything you’re getting, you fight to survive and multiplying is surviving in a plants eyes. Thus, more blooms = more seeds. Boom.

 

Contact us to get on the schedule!

© The Naturarian

Summer Annual Containers 2019

Summer annual container time!!! Please contact me if you’d like your containers planted.

 

If you’re looking for sensational summer color, look no further! Summer pots are the way to go. Not only are they full of pizzazz, the color is often right in your face, literally, especially if your favorite container is on a pedestal.

Be sure your container / pot is very clean to start the season with. A good, stiff brush dipped in a 10% bleach solution will do the trick. This will kill off any of the nasties waiting to infect your flowers. This cleaning should take you through the season also. No need to disinfect after each season change. (Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter)

You don’t need to remember a bunch of annual names. The only thing you need remember for a well-presented display is: Thriller, Filler & Spiller! The Thriller is that one large plant that is generally in the center and taller than the rest. Filler are those mid-range sized plants, often of ‘fatter or fuller’ stature. Spiller is just that, plants that hang over the edge of the pot.

Here’s where your imagination needs to run free through the flowers. In many of the containers below, the photos are of the plants after there has been a bit of growth put on them. You can also get instant height from a trellised plant such as a mandevilla, jasmine or other vine.

Another tip ~ Flowering can be increased if the plants are kept on the drier side. This takes a bit of skill, as you don’t want them to dry-out, but keep them on the brink of drying. Why?!? Because. Think of it this way. If you’re kept all fat and happy without doing anything, why not just enjoy the hand-outs? (can you say ‘vegetative growth’? Haha!) However, if you need to work for everything you’re getting, you fight to survive and multiplying is surviving in a plants eyes. Thus, more blooms = more seeds.

©The Naturarian

Why Native Plants Rock – 4 of 4

Street side bioswale full of colorful flowers
Street bioswale

BIOSWALES AND RAIN GARDENS

The fundamental basis for encouraging use of native plant species are for improved soil erosion control in waterways, and the slowing of storm water run off. Many homeowners have a problem with seasonal, storm water accumulating on their property. Again, the solution lies with the installation of native plants in bioswales or a rain gardens. The difference between the two are: A bioswale is generally sloped to facilitate the movement of water, and a rain garden holds the water to be infiltrated into the local soil. Both are great for the environment and also promote and provide wildlife habitats.

Bioswales (also known as infiltration swales, biofilters, or grassed swales) are vegetated open canals purposely designed to reduce and treat storm water runoff. Like open ditches, they convey storm water from one source to a discharge point, but unlike ditches, they deliberately promote slowing, cleansing, and infiltration of the water along the way.

There are some design variations of the bioswale, including grassed channels, wet swales and dry swales. Grassed channels are primarily grass, and are the easiest to install, but it lacks in the slowing of storm water and removal of pollutants. A wet swale involves standing water at times, and is not usually wanted by homeowners. The dry swales are the most beautiful and functional of the three. These generally include many different types of plants, and the best method for the slowing and pollutant removal in storm water. Because they are made to move higher volumes of water, they may include an underlying rock reservoir, and / or a perforated drain-tile.

One of the biggest benefits of a bioswale is its pollution filtering properties. Above ground plant parts (stems, leaves, and stolons), retard flow and thereby support particulates and their associated pollutants to settle. The pollutants are then leeched into the soil where they may become immobilized and/or decomposed by beneficial bacteria.  A well-constructed bioswale installed along a roadway could reduce the amount of carbon-based pollutants like motor oil in the environment. Among the many benefits of vegetative swales, they also provide stabilization and prevent erosion, cost less to install than traditional curbs, and again, are much nicer to look at compared to concrete and asphalt.

cross section of a rain garden

Rain Gardens are landscape features designed to treat storm water runoff from hard surface areas such as roofs, roads and parking lots. They consist of depressed garden areas, where runoff can pool and infiltrate into the native soils below. Storm water enters the rain garden via an inlet pipe, such as the downspout of a residence. Small storm events can usually be temporarily stored until they infiltrate into the ground. Most rain gardens are designed to pond no more than 2-3 inches above the soil bed. Where native sub-soils have low infiltration rates, rain gardens often have a drain rock reservoir and perforated drain system to take excess water to another point. The constructed soils of the rain garden, and the overlying mulch layer, are designed to replicate many of the pollutant removal mechanisms that operate in wetland ecosystems. Though rain gardens do remove pollutants from runoff water much like a bioswale, if the pollutants are of a higher concentration, a bioswale may be a wiser choice.

There are many native plants adapted to having “their feet wet”. Some wildflower, fern, grass, and sedge options for the Lake County area are:

  • Aster puniceus, Purple-stemmed aster
  • Caltha palustris, Marsh marigold
  • Eupatorium maculatum, Joe-pye weed
  • Eupatorium perfoliatum, Boneset
  • Geum rivale, Bog avens
  • Helianthus grosseratus, Big-toothed sunflower
  • Liatris pycnostachya, Prairie blazing star
  • Lobelia spicata, Pale-spiked lobelia
  • Mimulus ringens, Monkey flower
  • Solidago spp., including S. gigantea, S. ohioensis, and S. riddellii, Goldenrods
  • Verbena hasta, Blue vervain
  • Vernonia gigantea, ssp. gigantea, Tall ironweed
  • Thelypteris palustris, Marsh fern
  • Calamagrostis canadensis, Canada bluejoint
  • Carex comosa, Bottlebrush sedge
  • Carex muskingumensis, Palm sedge

Population growth of Lake County will cause stress on the native environment unless residents are informed of mitigation efforts and encouraged to use native plants in their landscape. By using native plants, a community can reduce water use, pesticide/herbicide use, and maintenance cost/time. The extended root systems of natives help stop erosion and promotes soil health.  Native plants restore the surroundings, and encourage native insects and animals to inhabit the area.

Here’s a great link to the Wisconsin Extension Natural Resources Departments “How To_Build_RainGardens”, one of the best I’ve scoped out. It has ‘recipes’ for rain gardens that supply all the names of plants that do well in different types of soils and light requirements.

© The Naturarian

 

Why Native Plants Rock – Part 3 of 4

far side comic of a dog mwing the lawn badly
Credit: The Far Side – If my husband could teach our dogs to mow the lawn, he’d be a happy man!

America’s fascination with green lawns has brought the total crop area to 40.5 million acres, and cost Americans a total of about $30 billion last year. Kentucky Bluegrass – Poa pratensis, the most common lawn grass used in this area has a root system of approximately 1” – 2” at best. Because of the shorter root zone, and non-native status, a Bluegrass lawn requires more water, nutrients, and maintenance. Some of the statistics reported by The National Wildlife Association regarding typical lawns in the United States are:

  • 30% of water used on the East Coast goes to watering lawns; 60% on the West Coast.
  • 18% of municipal solid waste is composed of yard waste.
  • The average suburban lawn received 10 times as much chemical pesticide per acre as farmland.
  • Over 70 million tons of fertilizers and pesticides are applied to residential lawns and gardens annually.
  • Per hour of operation, a gas lawn mower emits 10-12 times as much hydrocarbon as a typical auto. A weed-whip emits 21 times more and a leaf blower 34 times more.
  • Where pesticides are used, 60 – 90% of native earthworms are killed. Earthworms are important for soil health.

These statistics address the environmental argument for lawn alternatives, but there are the time and money factors to figure in also.

The other problem for most homeowners to wrap their mind around is the difference between cool season grasses and warm season grasses. Warm or cool season refers to when the lawn is growing, i.e. a cool season grass grows when it is cool (spring / fall), a warm when warm (summer). Kentucky Bluegrass (a cool season grass) is green and needs little water or nutrients during the spring or fall months, but needs constant mowing. However, during the hot, summer months, cool season grasses go dormant, often turning yellow and crispy. This is usually a problem for Joe Homeowner that expects the lawn to be green all year. This is also the time of year (June – August) that most water is wasted (and overuse of nutrients) by desperate homeowners thinking their grass is dieing. Educating the public about the seasonal nature of Bluegrass (going dormant) could possibly reduce water waste, but peer pressure and the persona of the “Perfect Green Lawn” will most likely win out, for now…

buffalo grass
Buffalo Grass

Many lawn alternatives arguably look just like a lawn. Buchloe dactyloides, commonly known as Buffalo Grass, is one of the only perennial, native grasses that can be found from Montana to Mexico. It is a stolaniferous, very drought tolerant, varieties can be from 2” – 8”, and if left unmowed, will have attractive seed heads. Choice of variety (and personal preference) will be the factor of how often the lawn will need to be mowed, but 2X a month is about average. It is a warm season grass, opposed to the Bluegrass, so it is slow to start growing in the spring, but will be green during the warmer months without (or very little) added water or nutrients (compost).

white clover instead of lawn
White clover

Another alternative to the standard lawn is Clover, which, from a distance can look like a lawn, but not close up. Though there are many, non-native Clovers to choose from, Trifolium repens, or White Clover is the only native of Illinois. Clovers are in the Bean family (Fabaceae), which have a unique ability to recondition the soil by returning nitrogen to it (called: nitrogen fixation). Farmers often rotate Clover seasonally into their fields to prevent weeds, reduce compaction (because of the deep root system), and to restore nitrogen levels to the soil.

Although Clover does not look like a traditional lawn, it will act much like one without all the hassles. Clover is very low maintenance, and stays green with little water and no mowing (unless wanted). Fertilizers are unnecessary, as Clover provides it’s own nutrients to itself by nitrogen fixation. The real benefit for Lake County residents is that it grows well in the hard, clay soils and will better the soil in the process. Another advantage for dog owners, it does not yellow from urine. The cost of a Clover lawn is inexpensive, at about $4 to cover a 4000 square foot area. Durability is the only downside to clover, as it can handle foot traffic, but not hard-core activities.

creeping thyme groundcover inbetween flgstone steppers
Thymus praecox – Creeping Thyme

A compromise option is a half Clover, half Buffalo Grass (or Bluegrass) lawn that will be able to handle the stresses of an active family. Sadly, society may look down at the combination, as it looks as though weeds are overtaking the lawn, especially in the spring when the Clover flowers (beautifully). A back yard may be a better location for this type of arrangement for someone trying to break the ‘bluegrass lawn mode’.

There are many alternatives to lawns (groundcovers) people can use that have their own special characteristics. Thymus praecox, commonly known as Creeping Thyme is an Illinois native that blooms shortly in the spring with light pink flowers. A solution for those shady, moist, hard to grow areas is Thuidium delicatulum, commonly known as Fern Moss, also a native to our area. Both can take a small amount of foot traffic, and most often are used in between stepping stones or rock type paths.

Come back tomorrow for the last part of the Native Plant series.

© The Naturarian

Why Native Plants Rock – Part 2 of 4

Dutchman's breeches white flower
Dicentra cucullaria – Dutchman’s breeches

OUR NATIVE PLANT SPECIES

Encouraging native plant use in the landscape can help the community save local native species, help with water related issues, and reduce pollution. Using native plants will help correct the problems connected with compaction and soil health.

Native plants can be defined as being indigenous or occurring naturally in a given geographic area and not introduced to that area by humans. When it comes to native plants, the “geographical area” is a 50-mile radius. The distinction between native and non-native species is important because native species have generally adapted and evolved with the competing species, predators, and diseases of an area over many thousands of years. Native species are therefore generally in reasonable ecological balance with their associates and competitors, and have pests, predators, or diseases that limit their abundance.

chart showing how deep our native plant roots goThe Lake County area was part of the tall grass prairie lands, and the soils are the richest of all the soil orders. The reason for this is native plants have extensive root systems which improve the ability of the soil to infiltrate water and withstand wet or erosive conditions. When comparing root systems of non-native to native plants, the differences are obvious. Most native plants roots are 2-3 times longer and more fibrous than non-natives are. The root systems of a native plant are on an average 7′ feet deep, with some reaching up to 15′ feet. Because roots reach these depths, the soil becomes very rich with nutrients at lower levels.

Soil taxonomists have assigned the name “Mollisol” (soil order) to this type of soil, characterized as having a dark-colored organic surface layer of approximately 1”-3” (O horizon), and an extensive next layer of dark loamy soil (A horizon) from 3’ – 18” down.

A homeowner can reduce their time input, money, water use and pollution output by just reducing the lawn size of their property and adding native plant gardens. After a native plant garden establishes itself (1 – 3 years), the maintenance time involved plummets. More garden areas mean less lawn areas, and all the maintenance requirements of it. The cost of a native garden can be very affordable, as seeds can cost as little as $30 covering a 500 square feet area. After removal of the lawn (sod remover rental of $48/day), installation is as easy as a disk tiller (rental for the day $32), some hard work, and the seed. This method is for a patient person, as some flowering, native plants (forbs = flowering plants) can take up to 3 years to bloom. Most homeowners would like to have something to look at quickly, so mature plants would be best, or another possibility is a mix of plugs (immature plants) and seed.

The newly seeded/planted area will need extra water to germinate/get started and throughout the first season. However, after a native garden becomes established, the plants can withstand most droughts, only needing a small amount of water in desperate times. This saves time, money and resources.

Lastly, native plants do not need any commercial fertilizer, which pollutes the environment. Natives are happy to receive compost as a method to get vitamins. Compost application can be as easy as leaving vegetation and leaf residues to over-winter, taking free manure from any of the horse farms nearby (remember to dig deep for the good stuff!!) or from your compost bin. Many natives, mostly of the wetland type, can actually extract toxins from the soil, mitigating damage done from commercial fertilizers.

Stay tuned! Tomorrow we’ll discuss some ‘lawn substitutions’ for those die-hard lawn fans.

© The Naturarian

Why Native Plants Rock – Part 1 of 4

canadian white violet flower
Canadian White Violet

Many native plants, animals and insects have become endangered as the world’s population grows and expands into areas previously untouched by humans. To mitigate these issues, residents should be encouraged to use native plants in their landscape. Not only do natives promote habitats, a community can save water and reduce erosion and flooding problems.

Lake County, Illinois’s 2010 census has the population at 703,462 with projections of 786,000 by 2020. Lake County is one of the fastest growing counties in Illinois, and that will mean many, large subdivisions being built here.

dead dirt
The ‘Dirt-Pile-Of-Death’…..

One of the problems is the builders of these new communities strip off a deep, top-layer of earth before building, and pile it up in the corner of the land. This “top-soil” looses nutrients, becomes compacted, and looses it’s air circulation promoting harmful, bacterial growth within it. As the houses are being built, heavy construction equipment collapses and compacts the lower horizon of soil (generally clay here) promoting poor drainage. After building is complete, the piled up, nutrient poor, mediocre topsoil is replaced. Aside from installing a water greedy lawn, the neighborhood is usually left with little other vegetation.

NON-NATIVE AND INVASIVE SPECIES

Another problem is when new people move to a new area, they want to bring or install the plants they remember from home. Most non-native plants are not deleterious, but they will use up more of your time and resources. However, sometimes these non-native plants can become extreme bothers; these species are called invasive species. A fable many, naive people believe is that an area overrun with non-natives will “go back” to native plants if an area is left alone; this is untrue!

There are many non-native plants that are generally no danger to the local environment. Though many of the non-invasive, non-native plants that people use in their gardens are stressed in the different environment, they may acclimate over a few years. Despite the fact that the plant may look healthy, it may be because of all the additional water, fertilizer and care a person must give to it. Because of all these added requirements these plants often become a maintenance issue, pollution concern (fertilizer run-off) and accrue costs accordingly.

burning bush type of plant with red leaves not on fire haha
Euonymus alaus – Burning bush

The real danger to the native landscape is non-native, invasive species. An invasive plant has the ability to thrive and multiply aggressively outside its natural range (everything is native to somewhere). Some invasive plants are worse than others.  Many invasive plants continue to be admired by gardeners, and sold illegally by nurseries that may not be aware of their weedy nature, or just want to make money. Others are recognized as weeds but property owners fail to do their part in preventing their spread.

Examples of some of the plants that were just recently added to the invasive species list for this area were: Acer platanoides – Norway Maple, Berberis thunbergii – Japanese Barberry, Euonymus alata – Burning Bush, Viburnum opulus – European Cranberry Bush, and Lonicera spp. – all exotic honeysuckles, to name a few.

Some of the characteristics used to classify an invasive species are:

  • They produce large numbers of plants seasonally.
  • They tolerate many weather conditions and soil types.
  • They spread proficiently by wind, water, and animals.
  • They grow rapidly, allowing them to displace slower growing plants.
  • They spread rampantly and are free of the checks and balances of their native range.

If people continue to use non-native plants in the landscape, many native species of plants, insects and animals will be lost. Aside from this, the cost of non-invasive plant maintenance and the time needed to care for them are higher, as the non-natives cannot fight out the invasives (increased weeding time and/or herbicide use). However, a native plant garden that is established and has it’s biosphere in check will be able to fend off most non-natives.

Check in tomorrow for the next part of the four day series

© The Naturarian

How to Attract Butterflies With Host Trees!

I’ve seen and read many lists of flowers to plant to attract pollinators, including butterflies to the garden. How a flower is shaped and when it blooms are key to luring these beauties in. Although I feel it’s a great start to attracting a diversity of insects to the garden, most of these lists only address the feeding aspects of an adult butterfly.

Another detail I notice is most lists only include annuals and perennials, which are herbaceous (soft stemmed). Many great trees and shrubs are lacking representation in these blooming lists. Not only that, butterflies need ‘host plants’ for their larvae. A host plant is just what it sounds like, a plant that an insect (butterfly) can lay their eggs on and when the larvae hatch, can be fed upon. Usually, we’re not talking about much damage to the tree. Nothing the tree can’t handle.

Because I speak for the Lorax, and he speaks for the trees… I’ve compiled a list of TREES that many butterfly parents choose to raise their young on. So, don’t just think of the adult butterfly and the flowers, think about a great investment tree, that can serve as a butterfly nursery!

If you’d like a quote for a tree install, please contact me 🙂

The following is a list of larval host tree & shrubs and the butterfly species that are attracted to them.

Printable List – .pdf format

Amelanchier spp. – Serviceberry

  • Bruce Spanworm
  • Blindy Sphinx (small)
  • Striped Hairstreak
  • Amorpha canescens
  • Black-spotted Prominent
  • Dog Face
  • Asimina triloba
  • Zebra Swallowtail

Betula spp. – Birch

  • Compton Tortoiseshell
  • Dreump Duskywing
  • Mourning Cloak
  • Tiger Swallowtail
  • White-marked Tussock Moth

Carya spp. – Hickory

  • Hickory Hairstreak
  • Hickory Horn D.
  • Luna Moth
  • Skipper spp.

Catalpa

  • Catalpa Sphinx
  • Ceanothus americanus
  • Filamont Beaver
  • Spring/Summer Azure

Celtis spp. – Hackberry

  • American Snout
  • Io Moth
  • Question Mark
  • Mourning Cloak
  • Spiny Oak Slug
  • Tawny Emperor
  • Comptonia
  • Gray Hairstreak

Cornus spp. – Dogwood

  • Monkey Slug
  • Dogwood Thyativid
  • Polyphemus Moth
  • Spring/Summer Azure
  • Unicorn Caterpillar

Corylus spp. – Filbert

  • Polyphemus Moth
  • Saddled Prominent

Crataegus spp. – Hawthorn

  • Interruped Dagger Moth
  • Small Eyed Sphinx
  • Smeared Dagger Moth
  • Striped Hairstreak
  • Fraxinus spp.
  • American Dagger Moth
  • Black Auches
  • Giant Leopard Moth
  • Harvis Three-Spot
  • Hickory Horned Devil
  • Linden Looper
  • Spiny Oak Slug
  • Tiger Swallowtail
  • Lindera benzoin
  • Giant Leopard Moth
  • Promethea Moth
  • Spicebush Swallowtail

Populus spp. – Poplar

  • Compton Tortoiseshell
  • Red-spotted Purple
  • Twin Spotted Sphinx
  • Satin Moth
  • Sigmoid Prominent
  • Viceroy
  • Virgin Moth

Prunus spp. – Cherry

  • Cherry Dagger Moth
  • Coral Hairstreak
  • Striped Hairstreak
  • Viceroy
  • Wild Cherry Sphinx

Prunus serotina – Black Cherry

  • Tiger Swallowtail
  • Red-spotted Purple

Ptelea trifoliata – Common hoptree

  • Giant Swallowtail
  • Quercus spp.
  • Striped Hairstreak
  • Edward’s Hairstreak
  • Banded Hairstreak

Rhus spp. – Sumac

  • Spring/Summer Azure

Ribes spp. – Currant

  • Gray Comma
  • Rubus spp.
  • Sphinx Hairstreak

Salix spp. – Willow

  • Acadian Hairstreak
  • Compton Tortoiseshell
  • Mourning Cloak
  • Northern Finned Prominent
  • Red-spotted Purple
  • Striped Hairstreak
  • Viceroy
  • Sassafras albidum
  • Cecropia Moth
  • Imperial Moth
  • Io Moth
  • Spicebush Swallowtail
  • Smilax
  • Spotted Phosphila
  • Turbulent

Spiraea spp. – Spirea

  • Woolly Bear

Tilia spp. – Basswood

  • Question Mark

Viburnum spp.

  • Hummingbird Cloverwing
  • Vitis spp.
  • Grapeleaf Skeletoniter
  • Xanthoxylum spp.
  • Giant Swallowtail
  • Skipper spp.

© The Naturarian

Common Snowdrops ~ Galanthus nivalis ~ Blooming 3-23-2019

White snowdrop bulb bloomingWow! A Saturday post! 😉white snowdrop bulb blooming I usually like to collect
my photos on the weekends and post on the weekdays, HOWEVER, this was too awesome to wait!

I noticed this little donation from Mother Nature on the side of my house last year! I didn’t see any in the past, however, it was April 9th when I had discovered them last year. Way later than this year. I hope this is a good sign that things will progress a bit faster this year! Mr. Groundhog is hopefully right.

© The Naturarian