Tag: houseplants

Arrowhead Plant – Syngonium podophyllum Nephthytis

imageI had these wicker plants hangers for years before that, not knowing what to put in them… I finally found these two Arrowhead plants from work about five years ago and thought they were a great fit! They love their south facing window, which gives them very little light in the summer and a full days worth during the winter. They really thrive and grow during the winter. They tend to take a pause from growing in the heat of the summer.
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These are relatives of the Philodendron, another easy plant to grow. They like moist soils, but don’t over-soak them. They like a light 10-10-10 fertilizer every 3 months.

Plants inside can get spider mites. These don’t get moved outside during the summer, so they’ve been insect free.

Pruning is a bit tricky. You don’t want to cut all the way down to the split or you will nip the tip of the new leaf off. As you look at the stem that branches off, you will notice there is a bulge in the stem, this is where the next leaf is curled up in it’s stem.

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A still rolled up leaf.

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The plant will start to shoot ‘runners’ (l o n g branches) after a few years. If you like them, keep them. I’ve got one that is about 15 feet long. I just want to see how long it will actually get! To keep the plant bushy, these should be pruned off. If you do this during the summer months, place the piece, now known as a ‘cutting’, into water and it should soon root, then plant it in a light mix.

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This is the start of a runner. See the thick ends of the leaf stem at the main branch? Don’t cut below this.

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After it grows out, the brown dried-up stem can be cut, do not peel it!

© The Naturarian

African Violet’s Boast 10 Months of Blooms!!

African Violets are one of the easiest flowering plants to enjoy inside during the cold weather of the Midwest. With a good initial set-up and some minor care, African Violets will bloom ten months out of the year.

Procuring an African Violet is convenient and low cost. I always goes to the indoor plant section of the Big Box store where the price for one is around $2.50.

African Violets require a special acidic soil that must be kept moist. Because of this, a normal, growing pot is not recommended. There are two types of pots: one type has a pot-within-a-pot soaking in water and the other uses capillary action via a wick within the soil.  I created a system with a glass bowel, decorative rocks, and a terra cotta pot. (see photo)

During the summer months African Violets can be moved outdoors in a partly-sunny location. When the temperatures get below 50F it’s time to bring them inside. Place them in a South or West window for the most available sunlight. Most flowering plants also require a dark period to bloom. Make sure there are no nightlights in the vicinity.

African Violets do not like drafts either, so keep them away from doors, vents, space heaters, and fans.

When it comes to watering, there’s nothing easier than an African Violet. Both type pots have a reservoir that only needs refilling with quality, non-softened water. No guesswork involved.

To help maintain the flowering of the plant, be sure to give is a dose of liquid fertilizer according to the labels directions.

African Violets can bloom 10 months out of the year. Care is the key to keeping it in bloom.

Maintaining a good watering schedule is important. They can go a few days being empty, and it is ok to do that periodically, just not to “droop” status. If the whole plant is drooping, water from above and fully soak pot to revive, careful not to wet leaves.

Always use good water. African Violets like it a bit acidic, and our Midwestern water is alkaline. Bottled or filtered water works well, but room temperature, melted snow is slightly acidic and a better choice if available.

The rocks and outside of the pot need to be rinsed off monthly. Sometimes fungus (green) will begin to grow in the water, or the pot will develop a white film on it. The white film is mineral salts, and needs to be removed. An old toothbrush works without using any soap. It’s OK to let a bit of water to run through the pot, as it rinses the mineral salts thru the soil and out the sides of pot, just keep the leaves as dry as possible.

Prune off the dead flowers with a scissors, don’t pull. Just trim the individual dead flower, as the rest of the main stem might still be blooming. This steps-up additional flower production for the plant.

Remember, it is seriously stressful for the plant to flower (think pregnancy!) So, after a good run of blooming, the plant may chill, and just be green for awhile. Be happy with that, and anticipate blooms after a short rest. Generally, stores sell these in bloom so people would buy them. Don’t be surprised if that rest period comes sooner than expected.

Prune off any bad looking leaves at anytime with scissors.

Talk to your African Violet, it likes to listen to your problems (it also wants your CO2)…

Check the bottom leaves that rest on the edge of the pot, they may get damaged/bent with age. Promptly remove them.

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©  The Naturarian